“The Basics of Corset Building” by Linda Sparks: a review


Linda Sparks is the owner of the company Farthingales which has a store in Stratford, Canada. I purchased the 2008 hardcover edition of “The Basics of Corset Building” back in very early 2011, for less than $20 – the cheapest place I found it at the time was on Amazon. It’s only 77 pages long, but don’t let that fool you – it’s chock full of information. There’s no froth in here – pretty much no history or filler; just instructions.

If you prefer to watch the review instead of read it, you can view my video (from last year) here:

In the foreward Ms. Sparks jumps right in by saying that anyone who can sew a straight line can sew a corset. Her methods are friendly yet no-nonsense – she does a good job of saying “yes, there’s a lot of fine detail and many steps to constructing a corset, but building a corset from start to finish doesn’t have to be scary.” If you’re willing to put in the work and practice some patience you can make a corset.

There are four sections in the book:

Section one focuses on what you’ll need to make a corset. She dedicates a chapter to each of the tools involved like awls, bone cutters, pliers etc. (I believe you can preview this chapter on Google Books.) There are also chapters on textiles (being the strength fabric and fashion fabric, waist tape etc.), and also a chapter on supports and hardware of the corset – the bones, tips, busk, and grommets. Most of the materials in this section you can also buy directly from her online store.

Section two explains in detail the steps of putting a corset together. How to cut and tip bones – both steel and plastic – how to insert a busk, how to insert grommets, working with lacing tape, tipping your laces, applying binding, etc.

Section three goes into techniques. Ms Sparks teaches you five different ways of making a corset: single layer that can be altered or not altered, double layer that can be altered or not altered, and lastly a corset that has a pretty fashion layer.

Section four goes into customizing corset patterns, namely Simplicity and Laughing Moon patterns, and how to fit mock-ups and alter your corset to your body. She also provides inspirational photos of the same corset patterns made with different fashion fabrics to show you how drastically they can change the overall look.

There’s also a glossary of terms at the back of the book. Throughout the book any words you see in bold you can find in the glossary.

My Personal Thoughts

Going through the other reviews of this book online, I notice that a lot of people complain about grammatical errors. Reading through the book myself, I admit that some errors jumped out at me, but I can forgive that because this book not supposed to be a literary masterpiece, it’s an instruction manual. It’s still perfectly readable and easy to understand and the content is good.

Pictures:this book is bountiful with pictures, both black and white photographs and diagrams. I liked how

“The Basics of Corset Building” by Linda Sparks – 2008 edition book cover

many pictures were featured, but for the total beginner corsetiere I think there could be fewer simple diagrams and more photographs. If the next edition of the book were to include colour photos that’d be great too. I understand depth and dimension a lot better in colour pictures compared to greyscale, and this would make it easier to keep track of overside and underside of fabric during the sewing instructions.

Succinctness: The title of the book is not misleading in any way: it goes through the BASICS of corset building and it is a handbook for BEGINNERS. If you have no knowledge whatsoever in making a corset, then this book is a fantastic resource. However if you have already made a corset before, you may be a little underwhelmed by this book. Many of the techniques like using an awl, applying grommets, inserting a busk, making internal boning channels, adding binding to the edges of a corset etc. I learned just by following instructions that came with the Simplicity 9769 pattern. However for those who like multiple resources, who like to learn about slight variations in construction methods or who just like to read the same methods explained in different words, then this book would be a great addition to your collection.

The photo of the corset on the cover of the book is gorgeous, but in the book it doesn’t teach you about diagonal bone placements or cording or any flossing techniques featured on the corset on the cover – I think this book has a lot of opportunity to expand in the future – Ms. Sparks could possibly add a chapter or create another entire book on advanced techniques. I did learn a few new things from this book but wish there could have been a bit more on finishing, embellishment etc. I was quite happy with my purchase anyway, as it is another way to support the corset making community and keep it alive.

You can read other reviews on this book or purchase it from Amazon, here.

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3 comments on ““The Basics of Corset Building” by Linda Sparks: a review

  1. Hi Lucy,

    Great book! However, I don’t believe that Linda maintains a store in Los Angeles, for over two years or more, unless she has recently opened a new venture there. Her shop used to be on Santa Monica Blvd., and I once offered a lecture there, along with my ROMANTASY team member and SoCal corsetiere Sue Nice. There being few enough retail outlets devoted to providing accurate advice and top notch corsets in the marketplace, I was sad to see the recession take its toll, but glad to learn that Linda moved on to more productive corset ventures and back to her Canadian home and corset supply business. She was and is a valued and supportive colleague in this specialty field. Corset hugs, Ann Grogan

    • Hi Ann,
      Thanks so much for clarifying, I’ll correct the post. Farthingales is still popular up here in Canada, and it’s still one of the only online stores for specialist corsetry supplies based in Canada. I’m glad to hear such camaraderie between Farthingales and Romantasy, and amongst those in the corset industry in general. 🙂

  2. Hi Lucy,

    Great book! However, I don’t believe that Linda maintains a store in Los Angeles, for over two years or more, unless she has recently opened a new venture there. Her shop used to be on Santa Monica Blvd., and I once offered a lecture there, along with my ROMANTASY team member and SoCal corsetiere Sue Nice. There being few enough retail outlets devoted to providing accurate advice and top notch corsets in the marketplace, I was sad to see the recession take its toll, but glad to learn that Linda moved on to more productive corset ventures and back to her Canadian home and corset supply business. She was and is a valued and supportive colleague in this specialty field. Corset hugs, Ann Grogan

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