1st day of Corset Seasoning

Adjusting the corset for comfort

I wore my corset for two hours on the first day, at a reduction of about 1.5 inches. The first thing that comes to mind as I’m seasoning the corset is that the waistline of the corset is not sitting properly at the true waist of my body. Especially when I sit down, I feel the corset wanting to shift up on my body, so that the smallest part of the corset is sitting on my floating ribs. Whenever this happens, I simply stand up and pull the corset down. Conversely, if I feel that my upper hips are uncomfortable and the corset is hitting that one annoying nerve that goes over my left hip bone, then I will pull up the corset. It’s not a complicated process.

Once the corset is properly broken in and fitted to my body, then I’ll be able to lace the corset tighter. At that point, the waist of the corset will be smaller than the circumference of my ribcage or my hips, and so the corset will “hook” itself under my ribs and will anchor itself in place and not slide around – this will make my corseting experience actually much more comfortable.

Problems with my asymmetric body

Because my left hip protrudes more than my right hip (and because one side of my body is more readily compressible than the other), it also means that twisting of symmetric corsets on my body is fairly common. I go to the extra effort to make sure my corset is straight and even when I first put on the corset and tie it up – but as the hours go by, if I notice the corset start to slant on me, I will tug the top and bottom edges of the corset in opposite directions so the corset is sitting vertical on me again.

If you notice that a new corset is sitting weirdly on  you, it’s a good idea to take off the corset and measure each side individually at the top edge (bust or underbust level), at the waist (smallest part) and at the bottom edge (hip level). Each side of the corset should match up in its “half circumference” (at least within about 1/4 inch is acceptable to me, unless it’s specifically designed to be an asymmetric corset). If you have an OTR corset that’s asymmetric on each side, see if you can get it exchanged.

Never ignore a twisted corset

One of my buddies from school had tried on one of my Isabella Josephine underbust corset at a party. She was a tiny little thing and achieved some amazing curves – but it was laced up at an obvious angle on her body. I cringed a bit at the observation, but didn’t say anything about it. I wish I had, because now whenever I try to wear that corset, the busk is diagonal on my body. Even though the corset was laced badly only once, that was enough for the corset to partially season to my friend’s figure, and it never fit the same way on me again. So now if I notice that the corset is very slanted, or if the corset is already slanted when I do up the busk even before I start lacing down, I take off the corset and start again. Wearing a twisted corset isn’t necessarily uncomfortable on me, it’s just REALLY REALLY REALLY annoying.

You can check out my video for more information, a demonstration on how I adjust the corset and how the structure of the corset slightly changes after just one wear!

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3 comments on “1st day of Corset Seasoning

  1. Ruth Rodrigues on said:

    Hi Lucy,

    This series came right on time! Im about to get a new corset and this time want to do the seasoning properly, even though i tried to follow your suggestions from your original post on this. It’s just so hard to have to wait for the corset to be perfect! I try to think of it as when I buy new shoes…they dont feel perfectly comfortable until you’ve worn them a little. Can’t wait for your new clues!

  2. I absolutely love that you’re doing this in-depth look at seasoning. I’m already hooked and can’t wait to see how the corset progresses!

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